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IBFF 2013 Vancouver (International Buddhist Film Festival)

From the World Cup to the remote Buddhist kingdom of Bhutan, three students are on a quest. The catch is…the teacher. Soccer-obsessed, charismatic filmmaker, and citizen of the world, Khyentse Norbu may be one of the most eminent Tibetan Buddhist teachers, but it’s a job description he slyly seems to reject at every turn.

"Provocative and surprisingly fast-moving." Ken Eisner, Georgia Straight

Vancity Theatre Screening

Why is the history of American humour so inextricably tied to Jewish identity? What was it about the Jewish experience that made them so funny? And what’s different now? These are the questions - some of them - that Canadian documentarian Alan Zweig pursues with a roster of fellow Jewish comedians, young and old.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Curated and presented by veteran CBC film critic Rick Staehling, this illustrated lecture examines the evolution of the opening sequence across a century of cinema history, from The Great Train Robbery in 1903 through Once Upon a Time in the West through to the stunning Children of Men and Seven (and many more).

Vancity Theatre Screening

The latest in our irregular series of archival shows throws a well-earned spotlight on the late Phil Keatley, whose long career at the CBC ranged from the 1950s to the 70s. Keatley is probably best known for his work as a producer on The Beachcombers, but here we look back further, to three black and white dramas he produced in BC between 1958 and 1967.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Dark, delirious and made under the sign of Scorsese, Rhymes for Young Ghouls is the angriest, punkiest, least "Canadian" Canadian movie you’ll see all year, and an electrifying feature debut from writer-director Jeff Barnaby. "Weed princess" Aila (the sensational Kawennahere Devery Jacobs) is used to looking out for herself on the Red Crow res, but when her old man gets out from prison things only get harder…

"It’s a tough, gritty piece of work, long on the violence but invested with the poetic sensibility you find in a Cormac McCarthy novel or Tom Waits song… [It] marks the arrival of a genuine cinematic intelligence, one sensitive to life’s more intimate, tender, even spiritual moments yet not averse to slamming the sledgehammer as circumstances require."—James Adams, Globe and Mail

’Exhibiting a vivid eye for potent imagery and a striking sense of the downtrodden vitriol [Rhymes For Young Ghouls] is a tremendously rousing film that announces the arrival of an exciting new voice in Canadian cinema." Scott A Gray, exclaim

"It has been years, probably since Xavier Dolan emerged with I Killed My Mother, since a Canadian director has debuted with a movie as impressive as Jeff Barnaby and Rhymes for Young Ghouls." Marina Antunes, Row Three

Vancity Theatre Screening

Join us for a special screening of a new Vancouver-made documentary highlighting a new breed of ethical entrepreneurs, capitalists with a conscience who are reframing the debate about profit and loss. The film will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Brett Wilson (Dragon’s Den), Joel Bakan (writer, The Corporation), Mark Brand (Save on Meat), RBC Director of Sustainability Sandra Odendahl and moderated by Sharad Khare. Tickets ($18) include post show reception.

Witches

A Canadian-made “porno chic” movie? It never happened! So historians say. But tonight’s screening proves otherwise as the never-released and unknown sexually-explicit [or: ‘X-rated’] horror-spoof Sexcula—-made entirely in British Columbia back in ’73—-screens in a World-Premiere of its original, unplayed 16mm answer-print. Produced with the help of Canadian film tax credits (that’s right—-taxpayers backed a porn movie—only in Canada!), Sexcula is one of the oddest entries in the colourful catalog of “Canuxploitation.”. Special guests to be announced.

Women in Film Festival
Vancity Theatre Screening

Presenting the true "behind the scenes" story of the rescue mission mythologized in last year’s Oscar-winner Argo - this time with due recognition of the pivotal role played by Canadian ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor.

"An intelligent, complex and tension-filled story that breathes life into historical events that are fast fading from our collective memory.

In doing so, the co-directors give Taylor (the diplomat) and many others their due and give Canadians at large a reason to feel rightly proud." Bruce DeMara, Toronto Star

Vancity Theatre Screening

Last September Neil Young spoke for many when he likened Fort McMurray to Hiroshima, "a wasteland". Local inhabitants were outraged, and at least one radio station banned Young from its playlist. Vancouver filmmaker Charles Wilkinson (Peace Out) treads a middle-ground with Oil Sands Karaoke, a portrait of the tar sands capital which includes both sobering vistas of massive environmental upheaval and an affectionate, non-judgmental look at the folks who live and work there, mostly when they’re letting their hair down at Bailey’s karaoke bar.

"Surprisingly sensitive… poignant, and beautifully shot." Marsha Lederman, Globe & Mail

Vancity Theatre Screening

A compelling, provocative portrait of the inspiring, controversial whale activist Paul Watson, and his relationship in two environmental movements West Coasters know very well: Greenpeace, which he left,and Sea Shepherd, which he founded. 

Director Trish Dolman will introduce the film via skype. Filmmaker Kevin Eastwood will be in attendance for this special screening, along with Sea Shepherd cofounder Ron Precious and Paul Watson for a Q&A via skype.

"Compelling… haunting… captivating." Variety

"[A] thoroughly thought-provoking and emotionally poignant portrait of a Canadian outlaw." 4/5 Katherine Monk, Vancouver Sun

Vancity Theatre Screening

Are animals sentient beings, or are they property? Photographer Jo-Anne McArthur has made it her life’s work to challenge the widespread willful ignorance that allows animal abuse to carry on unchecked. For more than a decade she has documented animals held in captivity to supply our food, clothing, scientific research, or simply our entertainment. Her photos are sometimes heartbreaking, but also often unexpectedly beautiful, always soulful, and inspiring. The same could be said of Liz Marshall’s film, which gives a sense of the horrors humans inflict on animals, but also the immense spiritual bond which many of us naturally feel for other living beings.

"A superb example of committed fimmaking." 4 stars. Susan Cole, Now magazine

When livestock begin dying and people become mysteriously ill after gas leaks in Peace River Country in northwestern BC, a series of bombs are set off on the pipelines in reaction. "Trouble in the Peace" follows Karl Mattson, an enigmatic and reclusive cowboy, as he struggles to make sense of what’s happening to his town and the people in it. Feeling scared and alone, he embarks on a unique course of action in an attempt to save his family and unite the community.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Yes, your parents almost certainly did have a sex life. But don’t worry kids, more than likely you put a stop to it! This smart, sassy Canadian comedy scoots through half a dozen relationships buckling under the strain of reconciling child rearing and sexual satisfaction. Parents of all shapes and sizes will surely relate.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Two women from opposite sides of Hitler’s Third Reich meet in Toronto, years after the Second World War–Mania, orphaned by the regime, and Johanna, possibly the Nazi guard who protected her. Weaving together their stories, this powerful documentary intimately explores their war experiences and witnesses their reunion more than half a century later.

Women in Film Festival
Vancity Theatre Screening

Introduced by UBC Film professor Ernest Mathijs, author of the first book length study of the movie, a rare chance to see arguably the best Canadian horror movie of the new millennium in 35mm. Emily Perkins and Katherine Isabelle star.

Vancity Theatre Screening

Morris Panych’s black comedy gets a slick and stylish cinematic treatment in this homegrown gem, one of the standout BC films from last year’s VIFF. Lawrence (Ben Cotten) would seem to have it all—he’s successful, charming, lucky, and relentlessly optimistic. Which only makes the much smarter, much less successful Holloman (David Arnold) hate him all the more!

“Dark, twisted, and really very funny ... a multi-dimensional screamer. One of the events top flicks.”—The Province

Women in Film Festival
Women in Film Festival

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