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7 Boxes

Program Running Time 100 min.

Films in Program

(7 Cajas)
(Paraguay, 2012, 100 mins, DCP)

17-year-old Victor grubs out a living with his wheelbarrow, delivering produce at a city market in Paraguay’s capital, Asuncion. He can scarcely believe his eyes when he’s handed half a C-note to babysit 7 boxes for a few hours (he gets the other half when the job is done). Of course it doesn’t take long before he wonders what his cargo might be, especially when the cops pile in.

"7 Boxes is a rollicking good time at the movies that offers breathtaking action and suspense, humor and appealing characters all in one visually flashy package." Boyd van Hoelj, Indiewire

"Crackles with the desperate energy of forced innovation." Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times

"7 Boxes has something for everybody." Chris Knight, National Post

Final Cut, Ladies and Gentlemen

Program Running Time 84 min.

Films in Program

Directed By: György Pàlfi
(Hungary, 2012, 84 mins, DCP)

Maybe the ultimate in "movie-ness", Gyorgy Palfi’s romance is 100% recycled, a love story assiduously compiled from hundreds of movie clips, featuring a who’s who of cinema greats, from Marilyn Monroe to Jackie Chan, Marlene Dietrich to Marcello Mastroianni, all recast as the emblematic Man and Woman. Hungarian visionary Palfi spent three years in the editing room crafting this unique mash up - a copyright nightmare that will likely never be available for home viewing.

"An odds-on candidate for the greatest movie ever made." New York Film Festival

"An odds-on candidate for the greatest movie ever made." New York Film Festival

"Final Cut might be the greatest film about film ever made… [It] might be the most romantic film ever made as well… The first film in forever that has elicited such wonderment in this jaded cineaste." Joshua Chaplinsky, Twitch

Particle Fever

Program Running Time 99 min.

Films in Program

(USA, 2013, 99 mins, DCP)

Unlocking the origin of all matter; that’s what’s at stake in the biggest, most expensive experiment ever undertaken, the Large Hadron Collider built to recreate the conditions of the Big Bang in 27km of tunnels near Geneva. This acclaimed documentary gives us a ringside seat as 1000s of scientists seek the elusive Higgs Boson - the "God Particle".

"Mindblowing." The New York Times

"Particle Fever succeeds on every level." Hollywood Reporter

"I cried at a movie about particle physics. And I wasn’t alone." Clara Moskowitz, Scientific American

Ida

Program Running Time 80 min.

Films in Program

Ida
Directed By: Pawel Pawelikowski
(2013, 80 mins, DCP)

Polish-born, UK-based filmmaker Pawlikowski (My Summer of Love) returns to his native land for this evocative, resonant art film about a novice nun discovering a family secret in the 1960s. Beautifully shot in black and white, this award-winning drama has been compared to the work of Francois Truffaut and Robert Bresson.

"In a very short time, Pawlikowski’s film tells us a powerful, poignant story with fine, intelligent performances." Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

"This story of faith and despair is gracefully told, its simple, uncluttered spaces and luminous black-and-white photography harking back to Robert Bresson."JR Jones, Chicago Reader

"It’s absolutely stunning, one of the year’s best films, and a fulfillment of the promise that the director has shown for so long." Oli Lyttleton, Indiewire

DOXA Festival 2014


Films in Program

Vepres siciliennes, from the Royal Opera House

Program Running Time 250 min.

Films in Program

(GB, 2014, 250 mins, DCP)

Paris in 1855, when the opera was first performed, provides the starting point for the interpretation by celebrated Norwegian born director Stefan Herheim. The opera ballet plays a significant role too, with Johann Kobborg choreographing for dancers from the Royal Ballet and Royal Danish Ballet. The story is set to impassioned and dramatic music, rich in showpiece arias and ensembles with striking choruses. Antonio Pappano conducts a world-class cast including Erwin Schrott, Bryan Hymel and Lianna Haroutounian in The Royal Opera’s first ever staging of Verdi’s grand opera.

Tom at the Farm

(Tom à la ferme)
(2013, 105 mins, DCP)
In French
Director:
CAST Xavier Dolan, Pierre-Yves Cardinal, Lise Roy

Showtimes

Xavier Dolan (I Killed My Mother), one of Canada’s most provocative and boundary pushing filmmakers, dips his toes into the mainstream with this gripping psychological thriller. Dolan plays the grief-stricken Tom, who ventures into the bucolic Quebec countryside for his lover’s funeral, only to become a pawn in a sadistic game perpetrated by the deceased’s savage, sexually repressed brother (Pierre-Yves Cardinal).

Nimbly juggling elements of noir, suspense and melodrama, Dolan demonstrates equal technical bravura as he daringly narrows his film’s aspect ratio, as the narrative progresses, cleverly conveying precisely how inescapable Tom’s circumstances have become. A far more rugged and menacing affair than you’d expect from Dolan, Tom at the Farm captivates throughout and leaves you wondering what else the multi-hyphenate might be capable of.

"An improbably exciting match of knife-edge storytelling and a florid vintage aesthetic best represented by Gabriel Yared’s glorious orchestral score. Dolan’s most accomplished and enjoyable work to date… Though the film is based on a stage play by Michel-Marc Bouchard (who shares screenwriting credit with Dolan), there’s more than a hint of Patricia Highsmith to this heady tale of elastically assumed identities and erotically charged male rivalry…" Guy Lodge, Variety

"In Quebec, no one can hear you scream… A tense, potent pleasure: imagine a Claude Chabrol thriller half-drunk on its own feints and seductions… By far his best film." Robbie Colin, Daily Telegraph

"Taut, creepy, compelling and sexy." Ben Walters, Time Out London

7 Boxes

(7 Cajas)
(2012, 100 mins, DCP)
In Spanish with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Celso Franco, Víctor Sosa, Lali González, Nico García, Paletita, Manuel Portillo

Showtimes

17-year-old Victor grubs out a living with his wheelbarrow, delivering produce at a city market in Paraguay’s capital, Asuncion. He can scarcely believe his eyes when he’s handed half a C-note to babysit 7 boxes for a few hours (he gets the other half when the job is done). Of course it doesn’t take long before he wonders what his cargo might be, especially when the cops pile in.

Directing team Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schembori put half a dozen characters at cross-purposes and send them careening through the maze-like market mostly on foot, often pushing a wheelbarrow before them. A hit at the Toronto International Film Festival, 7 Boxes is a winning combination of slumdog neo-realism and larky thriller, delivered with a dynamic panache that makes a virtue of the filmmakers’ minimal resources. It’s an indie calling-card movie, South American style: raw, energetic, and confident. More surprisingly, it also does enough to make you care about the characters.

"7 Boxes is a rollicking good time at the movies that offers breathtaking action and suspense, humor and appealing characters all in one visually flashy package." Boyd van Hoelj, Indiewire

"Crackles with the desperate energy of forced innovation." Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times

"7 Boxes has something for everybody." Chris Knight, National Post

We Are the Best!

(2013, 102 mins, DCP)
In Swedish with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Mira Barkhammar, Mira Grosin, Liv LeMoyne
Classification: PG coarse and sexual language

Showtimes

Lukas Moodysson (Together; Show Me Love) adapts his wife Coco’s graphic novel about three young misfits growing up in early ’80s Stockholm. Pixieish, mohawk-sporting Klara (Mira Grosin) and her best friend Bobo (Mira Barkhammar) are 13-year-old rebels looking for a cause. Despite having no instruments-or discernible musical talent-the two put all their energy into forming an all-girl punk band, recruiting their shy, classical guitar-playing schoolmate Hedvig (Liv LeMoyne) as the third wheel. With tender affection for his young characters and the period in which his film is set, Moodysson paints an ebullient and sharply observant portrait of DIY spirit and growing up different.

"A joyous, heart-swelling tale of youthful rebellion." Manohla Dargis, New York Times

"A joyous time capsule. Captures the DIY empowerment of punk rock and the bond of female friendships in one blissful swoop. For those of us who’ve been hoping that Lukas Moodysson would return to the tender touch of early movies like Show Me Love and Together, the wait is over." David Fear, The Village Voice

" A gloriously funny coming-of-age comedy – although age itself is squeezed almost entirely into the margins, crowded out by the film’s raucous, window-rattling love of being young." Robbie Colin, Daily Telegraph

We Don't Wanna Make You Dance

(2013, 95 mins, Blu-ray Disc)
Director:

Showtimes

The rock/funk band Miller, Miller, Miller and Sloan hoped to make it big in 1980s New York City music scene. They had talent, a unique sound, and fans—everything but a record deal. This "where are they now?" documentary is a kind of rock n roll 7 Up!, funny, rueful, and full of piercing insight.

"Like Michael Apted’s Up! series, the film showcases its tongue-in-cheek subject – Miller Miller Miller & Sloan, a band whose name, perhaps intentionally, resembles a law firm’s more than that of high-energy white funk musicians — at three different stages. In 1983, the three Miller brothers — stoic ringleader Dan, goofball Barney, and pretty boy Michael, then still in high school — and their motormouth, David Byrne-like pal Blake Sloan were a hot commodity on the New York City club circuit. Profiled by Kostelanetz again in 1988, they were awkwardly transitioning to electronic pop, with drummer/falsetto backup vocalist Michael now the silky-voiced frontman. By the 2008 segment — 15 years since the demise of the band — they had become (with one exception) suburban West Coast family men with jobs in software and video post-production. It’s precisely the down-to-earth normalcy of Kostelanetz’s subjects that makes We Don’t Wanna Make You Dance so poignant… Happily, Kostelanetz’s gentle, intimate approach keeps the proceedings light and even peppy – she balances out the bleakness. ." Sam Weisberg, Village Voice

"By the time the film ends you’ll be hoping for a reunion." Unseen Films

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