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Train of Shadows

(Tren de Sombras)
(1997, 88 mins, DCP)
Director:
CAST Juliette Gaultier, Ivon Orvain, Anne Celine Auch
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Sep 11 06:30 pm

On November 8, 1930, amateur filmmaker Gérard Fleury stood on the shores of Normandy’s Lake Thuit, watching the sun rise in preparation for an upcoming shoot that would never take place; he died later that day under mysterious circumstances. Out of this information, Guerín constructs a haunting meditation on the photographic and cinematic image, on loss and decay, on the passing of time, the recounting of history and the blurring of fact and fiction. He uses both re-enactments and decayed images to render ambiguous past and present, historical record and speculation, and to make poetry out of loss. (Harvard Film Archive)

"Ostensibly framed as a restoration of a degraded found film recovered some 70 years after the sudden and unexplained death of its creator, a Parisian attorney and amateur filmmaker named Gérard Fleury at a lake in the village of Le Thuit in Normandy, Tren de sombras (Train of Shadows) is a dense, sensual, and richly textured exposition of José Luis Guerín’s recurring preoccupations: the nature and subjectivity of the image-gaze, the permeable borders between truth and fiction, the role of architecture (and landscape) as palimpsest of hidden histories." Acquarello, Strictly Film School

In the City of Sylvia

(En la ciudad de Sylvia)
(2006, 84 mins, 35mm)
In French with English subtitles
Director:
CAST Pilar López de Ayala, Xavier Lafitte, Laurence Cordier
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Sep 10 06:45 pm
Sep 12 08:20 pm

In this programmer’s opinion one of the greatest films of the twenty first cnetury (and the one before that), Guerin’s masterpiece is a spellbinding contemplation of contemplation, the act – and the art – of seeing. The camera follows a young man (Xavier Lafitte) as he haunts a café in Strasberg, in search of… Sylvia, we guess. He gazes avidly at women. And we gaze too, watching him watching, seeing what he sees. Reminiscent of a Chekhovian short story, In the City of Sylvia is very simple and utterly transfixing, and it cuts to the heart of what the cinema is about. It is a film about love, the image, and desire, it is simultaneously silent (wordless) and a (song-less) musical, it is concrete and abstract, experimental, all this, and a sly discourse on Hitchcock’s Vertigo too.

Crime & Punishment

(2015, 110 mins, DCP)
Director:
CAST Lee Mason, Anna Samson, Christopher Bunworth
Classification: 19+

Showtimes

Oct 20 07:30 pm

When a desperate and disillusioned PhD student commits premeditated murder in the name of a theory, he finds that his soul can only be saved through the love of a religious prostitute. But will he confess in time or will the cunning police investigator ruin his chance at salvation? Based on Dostoevsky’s classic psychological thriller this Australian independent feature will be introduced by Alexander Burry, author of Multi-Mediated Dostoevsky (Northwestern University Press, 2011), and will conclude with a Q&A and discussion with director and writer, Andrew O’Keefe. The screening will be followed by a reception.

This screening is affiliated with the conference “Crime and Punishment at 150,” which is taking place at UBC October 21-22, 2016. For more details, please visit: http://blogs.ubc.ca/cp150

This event is co-organized by Katherine Bowers and Kate Holland, and supported by the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies (UBC), the North American Dostoevsky Society, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and Apocalypse Films.

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